Cuba, USA Talks on Human Rights to be Continued

The first Cuba-US talks on human right allowed to expose stances, paved the way for future meetings on the issue, and proved that respectful dialogue is possible, despite deep differences.

The first talks between Cuba and the United States on human right allowed to expose stances and pave the way for possible future meetings about the issue, but above all proved that a respectful dialogue is possible, despite deep differences.

The parties exchanged yesterday here some criteria for more than two hours at the headquarters of the Department of State, where concerns and methodological aspects were analyzed for the progress of the unprecedented debate, which was proposed by the island.

The context of the rapprochement on human rights is complex, for being one of the questions used by Washington against the Caribbean country, which denounces such stance as an attempt to justify the economic, commercial and financial blockade in force for more than 50 years and other hostile measures.

“The meeting ratified that there are deep differences between both governments regarding conceptions and the exercise of human rights,” Pedro Luis Pedroso, Assistant Director-General for Multilateral Affairs and International Law of the Cuban Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said at a news conference to offer details of those talks.

According to Pedroso, it was evidenced that civilized relations could be materialized, within the recognition and respect to those divergences.

In statements to the island’s journalists accredited to cover those talks, U.S. researcher and analyst Philip Peters stressed the need for good ties between the governments, particularly if they are neighbours.

Despite the different political systems and visions on human rights, the United States has maintained ties with countries from Saudi Arabia to China, Russia, Vietnam and Mexico, but has made Cuba an exception, a wrong approach, he said.

For the expert on economic affairs and author of publications about the Havana-Washington scenario, the parties should take advantage of the moment generated by the decision taken by Presidents Raul Castro and Barack Obama to take steps toward normalizing ties, announced on December 17, 2014.

Today’s dialogue is part of the discussions of issues of common interest, developed parallel to the process of restoration of diplomatic ties and the opening of embassies, agreed by the statesmen.

Cuban ambassador at the United Nations Office in Geneva and member of the delegation here, Anayansi Rodriguez, told reporters that the meeting reiterated discrepancies in the promotion and protection of human rights in the respective states and the international treatment in multilateral forums about the issue.

The hosting delegation, led by Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights, Tom Malinowski, stressed the exchange regarding the methodology, issues and structure of new contacts, “with date and place to be determined by diplomatic channels.”

In that sense, Pedroso told the press that the island has expressed concerns about patterns of discrimination and racism present in the American society, the intensification of police brutality, torture and extrajudicial executions during the fight against terrorism and the legal limbo of the prisoners in the illegally occupying part of the Cuban territory of Guantanamo.

The parties exchanged yesterday here some criteria for more than two hours at the headquarters of the Department of State, where concerns and methodological aspects were analyzed for the progress of the unprecedented debate, which was proposed by the island.

The context of the rapprochement on human rights is complex, for being one of the questions used by Washington against the Caribbean country, which denounces such stance as an attempt to justify the economic, commercial and financial blockade in force for more than 50 years and other hostile measures.

“The meeting ratified that there are deep differences between both governments regarding conceptions and the exercise of human rights,” Pedro Luis Pedroso, Assistant Director-General for Multilateral Affairs and International Law of the Cuban Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said at a news conference to offer details of those talks.

According to Pedroso, it was evidenced that civilized relations could be materialized, within the recognition and respect to those divergences.

In statements to the island’s journalists accredited to cover those talks, U.S. researcher and analyst Philip Peters stressed the need for good ties between the governments, particularly if they are neighbours.

Despite the different political systems and visions on human rights, the United States has maintained ties with countries from Saudi Arabia to China, Russia, Vietnam and Mexico, but has made Cuba an exception, a wrong approach, he said.

For the expert on economic affairs and author of publications about the Havana-Washington scenario, the parties should take advantage of the moment generated by the decision taken by Presidents Raul Castro and Barack Obama to take steps toward normalizing ties, announced on December 17, 2014.

Today’s dialogue is part of the discussions of issues of common interest, developed parallel to the process of restoration of diplomatic ties and the opening of embassies, agreed by the statesmen.

Cuban ambassador at the United Nations Office in Geneva and member of the delegation here, Anayansi Rodriguez, told reporters that the meeting reiterated discrepancies in the promotion and protection of human rights in the respective states and the international treatment in multilateral forums about the issue.

The hosting delegation, led by Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights, Tom Malinowski, stressed the exchange regarding the methodology, issues and structure of new contacts, “with date and place to be determined by diplomatic channels.”

In that sense, Pedroso told the press that the island has expressed concerns about patterns of discrimination and racism present in the American society, the intensification of police brutality, torture and extrajudicial executions during the fight against terrorism and the legal limbo of the prisoners in the illegally occupying part of the Cuban territory of Guantanamo.

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